July Portfolio Review
We started to see some rebounding in July as we moved into the second half of 2022!

Below is a review of my two portfolios through the end of July:

Not much to note in my Overall Top 10. This is the combination of both my Taxable and Roth IRA. Only notable change was $VWO decreasing from 5% to 4%, as I will note below.

Taxable Portfolio
% Change (vs S&P): +5.25% (-3.86%)
Contributions: $0
Dividends: $30.58 (-38% over June '21)
Buys: 1 share of $ABBV at $151.84 on 7/5
Dividend Reinvestments: 0.0027 shares of $BAM
Sells: None
Cash: 1.08%

Top 5 Positions:
  1. $CMA - 13%
  2. $VTI - 12%
  3. $VEA - 7%
  4. $VWO - 5%
  5. $PFE - 5%

Historic Trend:

Roth IRA
% Change (vs S&P): +7.45% (-1.66%)
Contributions: $0
Dividends: $9.55 (+195% over June '21)
Buys: 1 share of $HSY at $219.73 on 7/11/22
Dividend Reinvestments: 0.0256 shares of $KMB, 0.0176 shares of $EMB
Sells: 2 shares of $VEA at $39.66 and 2 shares of $VWO at $40.59 on 7/5/22 as part of quarterly portfolio rebalance
Cash: 1.15%

Top 5 Positions:
  1. $VTI - 12%
  2. $VNQ- 12%
  3. $SBUX - 9%
  4. $VIG - 9%
  5. $HD - 7%

Historic Trend:

I realized that I had a broken calculation in my trending calculations and was adding current month performance to the end value of ~6 months ago. This has been corrected and trend charts are now accurate.

Thanks for following along and I would love to hear any of your thoughts and questions in the comments!
post mediapost media
Erick Mokaya's avatar
$103.3m follower assets
Our newsletter this week
Check out our weekly newsletter that covers:

  • Data that CEOs are seeing does not suggest that a downturn is imminent
  • PE and VCs with record amounts of dry powder
  • AT&T saw some delays in collections of payments

Companies covered:


June Portfolio Summary
June was an interesting month. Mr. Market continued its downward trend, and we ended up with the worst 1st half of the year in 50 years. If you are still here and investing, congratulations for weathering, hopefully, the worst storm of our lifetimes.

Personally, I had a pretty decent month. I collected a decent amount of dividends, restarted contributions to my Taxable account and was able to make some buys.

Let's get into it:

Not much to note in my Overall Top 10. This is the combination of both my Taxable and Roth IRA. All positions stayed the same as May, with some slight shifting in positions. Only percentage change was $VEA going from 7% at the end of May to 6% today. I will break down individual portfolios below.

Taxable Portfolio
% Change (vs S&P): -6.56% (+1.83%)
Contributions: $60
Dividends: $76.72 (+147% over June '21)
Buys: 1 share of $ABBV at $140.97 on 6/13
Dividend Reinvestments: 0.0278 shares of $CNA, 0.0279 shares of $DD, 0.0063 shares of $RTX, 0.0347 shares of $XLE, 0.0195 shares of $SCHD, 0.0392 shares of $VDE
Sells: None
Cash: 2.03%

Top 5 Positions:
  1. $CMA - 13%
  2. $VTI - 12%
  3. $VEA - 7%
  4. $PFE - 5%
  5. $VWO - 5%

Historic Trend:

Roth IRA
% Change (vs S&P): -17.19% (-8.8%)
Contributions: $0
Dividends: $30.23 (-4% over June '21)
Buys: None
Dividend Reinvestments: 0.0154 shares of $EMB, 0.0043 shares of $HSY, 0.0054 shares of $DD
Sells: None
Cash: 1.92%

Top 5 Positions:
  1. $VTI - 12%
  2. $VNQ- 12%
  3. $VIG - 9%
  4. $SBUX - 9%
  5. $HD - 7%

Historic Trend:

I am happy to have weathered this storm and continuing to be able to contribute and buy great companies.

I am a little concerned about performance of my Roth IRA, but keep the goal of the portfolio in the back of my mind - build a portfolio for dividend income for retirement. Seeing as I still have nearly 30 years (within 11 days) until I hit 59 1/2 & the penalty-free withdrawal age, I am not too concerned.

I am going to continue to stay the course and execute my plan. Hopefully Mr. Market will feel better with the summer sun and start turning this thing around!

Thanks for following along and I would love to hear any of your thoughts and questions in the comments!
post mediapost media
Dividend Forecast - Week of 6/27
Good morning! Below are my expected dividends this week, and how they will be used.
​
Taxable
$SCHD - $0.70 per share, $1.43 total, reinvesting
$SCHF - $0.28 per share, $0.83 total, cash
$SCHB - $0.75 per share, $7.52 total, cash
$VTI - $0.75 per share, $7.52 total, cash
$VDE - $1.01 per share, $4.11 total, reinvesting
$BAM - $0.14 per share, $0.14 total, reinvesting
$PEP - $1.15 per share, $3.48 total, cash
$KO - $0.44 per share, $1.81 total, cash
$PPL - $0.23 per share, $4.11 total, cash
$CMA - $0.68 per share, $18.55 total, cash
Total - $41.98
​
Roth IRA
$VTI - $0.75 per share, $3.75 total, cash
$VNQ - $0.57 per share, $5.70 total, cash
Total - $9.45
​
Do you have any dividends coming in this week?
May Portfolio Summary
Not a lot of action in May. We have been focusing on using our extra money to pay down some credit cards to increase future cash flow, so I didn't have any new capital to work with. In the life of a buy and hold investor, that makes for a pretty boring month. No buys, other than automatic dividend reinvestments, and no sells. Nonetheless, May provided an "organic" observation of my portfolio πŸ˜‚
​
Below is my overall portfolio, with both accounts. I will break down where some of these positions are held in the discussions on each portfolio.
​

​
Taxable
% Change (vs S&P): -0.29% (+0.27%)
Contributions: $0
Dividends: $14.11 (+18% over May '21)
Buys: 0.0065 shares of $AAPL, 0.0096 shares of $ABBV, 0.0245 shares of $CARR (all Dividend Reinvestment)
Sells: None
Cash: 1.9%
​
Top 5 Positions:
  1. $CMA - 13%
  2. $VTI - 12%
  3. $VEA - 8%
  4. $VWO - 5%
  5. $PFE - 5%
​
Historic Trend:

​
Roth IRA
% Change (vs S&P): -1.36% (-0.80%)
Contributions: $0
Dividends: $10.02 (+1,001% over May '21)
Buys: 0.0040 shares of $LOW, 0.0166 shares of $EMB, 0.0488 shares of $CARR, 0.059 shares of $SBUX (all Dividend Reinvestment)
Sells: None
Cash: 1.5%
​
Top 5 Positions:
  1. $VTI - 13%
  2. $VNQ - 12%
  3. $VIG - 9%
  4. $SBUX - 9%
  5. $HD - 7%
​
Historic Trend:

​
One bit of commentary - I am happy to see 2 of the Top 5 in each account are individual companies. I have been working to balance the ETF portfolios I had built through Wealthfront and rolled over.
​
Looking forward to June - it is a large dividend month with the Vanguard ETFs paying out. Should provide some more opportunities to buy!
​
Would love to hear any of your questions, comments or concerns with my portfolio!
post mediapost media
My $CMA trades - 80 Years in the Making
As I have become more and more involved on Commonstock, I have gotten a number of questions about my Comerica ($CMA) position.

If you look at my profile, you will see that my best "trade" was selling $CMA for a 103.35% gain on January 9, 2022.

You might be asking, "What does this Scoreboard guy know about $CMA and how did he make this great gain"?

The truth is, this position in $CMA was started years ago - approximately 80 years ago!

I talked with my father-in-law to get some background and understanding of the $CMA position, and he provided me with so much more. This is not a story of a great stock pick, but a story of education, hard work, and building a legacy of Generational Wealth.

Quotes below are from a history my father-in-law shared with me to prepare this post

My wife's family has been investing for generations. The love of investing and understanding of the power of the stock market started with her Great Grandfather, passed down to her Grandparents, on to her father and uncle and now on to us.

The story starts with my wife's Great Grandfather sometime in the 1940's. He was a "math wiz who loved football and hockey". Working as a "checker" in the Detroit tool & die industry, Great Grandfather earned a great wage for his time. "With only one child... he plunged deep into the stock market in the 1940's". He utilized his understanding of math to build a discipline and the power of compound interest. He began dollar cost averaging into the Detroit Bank and Trust - which was deeply connected with the city of Detroit and its industry through good and bad times. "Between mergers, splits and dividends that single position grew massively".

Over the course of his life, Great Grandfather passed his knowledge and love for investing to his daughter and son-in-law (wife's grandparents). My wife's grandfather was an engineer from a working class family with little money and no investing knowledge but, "was also quite fascinated with the stock market and also liked the math and diving into income statements". A connection developed between Great Grandfather and his son-in-law and the investing torch was passed on to the next generation. My wife's grandparents understood the position they were in and understood that they had, β€œ'legacy' money and could impact generations to come". My wife's grandparents continued DCA'ing into a number of companies - with a heavy industrial Detroit focus, including the Detroit Bank and Trust. They also started portfolios for each of their grandchildren to continue the legacy and pass on the power of the stock market.

Years later my wife, and now I, have been incredibly lucky to inherit this portfolio. This portfolio allowed my wife to pay for college and still have a small portfolio left to continue on with. More importantly, we have access to generation's worth of knowledge in the stock market through family. I, similar to my wife's grandfather, am an engineer and had little prior exposure to the stock market. I have made a connection with my father-in-law through the stock market and have tried to learn as much as I can to continue the legacy that was started more than 80 years ago.

Fast forward to today, and the Detroit Bank and Trust has become Comerica Bank. After utilizing the portfolio to pay down debts, the only holding left in the portfolio when my wife and I got married was tried and true $CMA. My wife and I began actively managing this portfolio at the height of the pandemic in March of 2020. With such a large position in one holding, my initial goal was to balance the $CMA position with other holdings through new money. However, as I learned about the risks of a heavily concentrated portfolio (and $CMA's severe drop in the summer of 2020), I began to slowly trim this $CMA position. Proceeds from these sales have been used to build positions I feel can be held and passed to future generations, as well. I have been cautious only to trim and to never sell the entirety of the position.

$CMA is still a large percentage of my wife's grandmother's portfolio and they are struggling to trim the position due to the emotional attachment developed over generations:

"Funny story, in 2009 CMA dipped down to $20. My grandfather had passed... My Mom wanted to buy more. My Grandfather had taught my Mom and demonstrated in her life that when there are these big dips you want to buy more... My Mom bought more and asked me a few times since then to buy more including in 2020 when CMA dipped so low. My friend... calls her the Oracle of Detroit for her investing prowess".

The linked sale in January was part of my Quarterly Review. After an incredible run up at the end of 2021, I sold 10 shares of $CMA at price of $98.17 with an Average Cost Basis of $48.28. The oldest share in this lot was originally purchased on April 4, 2005! This $CMA position is slowly getting closer to right-sized for my portfolio and my oldest share currently held was purchased on October 2, 2008.

This isn't a story of a one time "great trade". This trade was the result of generations of investing and education of which my wife and I are lucky enough to be the benefactors. My goal is to continue the Family Tradition by directing the portfolio left to us and developing the love and understanding of the stock market for future generations.
Dividend Preview
I typically do a weekly dividend forecast on Monday mornings. This week is the second in my dividend dry season - no dividends this week 😭. We will be back at it with dividend income in May!

Last week I covered my Dividend History. This week I will be covering my Dividend Preview using the helpful tools at Track Your Dividends to show my future dividends and growth!

Track Your Dividends (TYD) offers the ability to track multiple accounts, as well as a summary of all accounts. Below are all Summary data:

We'll start with my Next 12 Months (NTM) dividend forecast. It is nice how TYD shows each month as a bar graph, including min, max and % variance month to month. This is a very helpful tool for those looking to develop a steady month-to-month dividend income.

NTM Min: $26 (May, August, November, February)
NTM Max:$98 (June)
NTM Variance: 73.9%

There is also a Confirmed Dividend calendar that is formatted with the greenest days being the highest dividend payment days. Below is my confirmed dividend calendar from April and for May. January, April, July and October 1 are my biggest dividend days with my largest dividend income, $CMA, paying out on that day.

Finally, we will visit the Future Value Tool. This tool calculates the future value of your portfolio and dividend income using historic growth rates to calculate future value. There is a table below that can be customized for expected Dividend Growth Rate, Annual Contributions, Price Appreciation and Maximum Dividend Yield. The below chart was calculated using the default values:

5 Year DGR: 6.51%
Annual Contributions: $0
Price Appreciation: 3%
Maximum Dividend Yield: 10%

Pretty neat to see how the dividend snowball will continue to grow!

Have you ever used Track Your Dividends? What tools do you use to track dividends and project growth?
post mediapost media
Portfolio Review
I am tagging along and sharing my portfolio for public discussion, like @strib, @growthinvesting, @investor_from_nepal, @from100kto1m and @sammeciar have done.

These holdings are split between two Merrill Edge accounts - a Taxable Brokerage for shorter term goals/possible early retirement and a Roth IRA built for dividend income in retirement.

I am 29 years old and a chemical engineer. These accounts have been built more or less over the last 6 years (minus the $CMA position). I contribute as I can, and utilize my Scorecard to indicate where to deploy new capital. As I mentioned yesterday, the ETFs are from Wealthfront accounts I rolled over into my self-directed accounts. I am not big on selling and the only positions on this list I have "trimmed" are $CMA, $VEA and $VWO.

Breakdown of where these holdings are residing:

Both Accounts:

Taxable:

Roth:

What are your thoughts?

Any questions/suggestions/advice?
post media
Portfolio History
I was inspired by @stonkmetal's recent post about his portfolio change since inception.

I ran a similar comparison with my Taxable Brokerage. This comparison is from my June 2020 brokerage statement compared to holdings as of 4/11/22.

June 2020 Top Holdings:
  1. $CMA - 48.5%
  2. $AAPL - 7.1%
  3. $SBUX - 4.3%

Total Holdings: 18

Between 2020 and today, the primary change is that I rolled my Taxable Brokerage that I had from Wealthfront into this account. This is where the large exposure to ETFs came into play. I estimate that 10-15 current positions are from the Welathfront transfer.

Today Top 3 Holdings:
  1. $CMA - 13.5%
  2. $VTI - 12.4%
  3. $VEA - 7.6%

Total Holdings: 46

I have talked a lot about over-diversification in my investments. This account is where that majority of that took place, as you can see. One positive is that I am still holding every single company that I held in 2020. +1 for buy and hold!

My Roth IRA, which I started later, is much more concentrated than this portfolio. I learned from my mistakes.
post mediapost media
One positive is that I am still holding every single company that I held in 2020.

Well done, @stonkmetal! Also, how wonderful that your wife's grandparents did that!
View 8 more comments
My Portfolio Statistics
There are some cool new features here on @commonstock - below are my Portfolio Statistics!

I have 55 active holdings across 2 accounts. I severely over diversified when I first started and am slowly working to control my diversification

21 trades a month seems a little high and average holding time of 5 months seems a little low. I have noticed that some trades get counted multiple times, which may be skewing these numbers.

I have an upcoming post on my $CMA trade above πŸ‘€ Stay tuned!

I try to focus on diversifying across sectors and industries as well. You can see over 47% is "Other" - these are ETFs mainly from my Wealthfront portfolios that I rolled over into my current actively managed portfolios. These have served as a solid foundation to build my portfolios around.

What are your thoughts? Feel free to ask me any questions! My goal is to be open and transparent and share as much of my journey as possible!
post media
And I'm not that far behind you on open positions!

I actually feel like I should make more trades per month... 3 is too low! (I feel like I get enough good info on Commonstock I could be making more bets)
View 9 more comments
Next
Commonstock is a social network that amplifies the knowledge of the best investors, verified by actual track records for signal over noise. Community members can link their existing brokerage accounts and share their real time portfolio, performance and trades (by percent only, dollar amounts never shared). Commonstock is not a brokerage, but a social layer on top of existing brokerages helping to create more engaged and informed investors.