@rabbijacob

Rabbi Jacob's avatar

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Portfolio ->

I think most of us are better of investing in your career and network than stocks.

However, investing is a lot of fun, interesting and ultimately addicting.

I live in Europe
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How big is the Metaverse's TAM?
Answer: somewhere between 1.9 Trillion and 19.2 Trillion. πŸ‘€


For those that love reading I got a few more of these here:

Also, @investmenttalk share the JPM metaverse link in the comments?
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I would like to add that BofA sizes the meta verse a lot more conservatively $390bn by 2025:

(part of the "Future tech primer" that is in the dropbox above.
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Patrick OShaughnessy on Mega-cap asset allocation
"The history of $GE makes you realize that at scale, capital allocation determines the outcomes

$AAPL buyback program, for example, is among best allocation / $ investments decisions ever

GE by contrast destroyed $500B+ of market cap. Twice Enron, Worldcom, and Lehman combined"

There is a really fun book called Billion Dollar lessons that talks about how companies lost billions of dollars. Some stories feel a lot like Ex-Post explainers as to why things didn't work out but the authors also try to include objectively why a certain decision looked good at the time. I really recommend this book to anyone interested in business stories/ history.
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Totally with you here. I can recommend reading The outsider CEOs by Willian Throndike. Specifically talks about a set of 8 CEOs who were tremendous capital allocators and their insane outperformance over the market and their peers. Bad Capital allocation is a no go in a mature company.
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Why do you prefer buying single names VS buying an index fund?
I'm curious to know what makes you guys prefer to own single names Vs quasi free index funds?

Also, in case you prefer options, why? And how do you size these positions?
Here my 2cents

The S&P is too much concentrated in the top10 holding. Approx 30% is in the hands of 10 stocks, and I don't like it, considering they are mostly all in the same industry.

I own approx $600k in 50 stocks with a very grade of diversification, and considering they are dividend-oriented, they are also low beta, so I feel comfortable with it.

You can argue that I can buy a Dividend Stock ETF, like $VIG, $VYM, or $VIGI. Still, in such a way, I will be forced to reinvest the dividends into the ETF itself, while I prefer to reinvest dividends on stocks in my portfolio that are underpriced at the moment.

My portfolio will NEVER outperform the S&P500 unless in a bear market, but it makes me comfortable.

Anyway, I also have around 200k on an ETF portfolio, so I am not against passive investment at all πŸ‘
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